Join the Fight for Clean Air

Last week, Lydia Rojas told her story about her daughter, Steph, who she tragically lost to an asthma attack. Lydia asked us to stand up to the big polluters and to make sure the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hears from the public that we want clean air; we want less soot that can trigger deadly asthma attacks and we want them to save lives.Share Lydia’s story with your friends and ask them to take action against soot pollution.

Thank you to those who have joined Lydia’s fight for healthy air by sending in your comments to EPA, asking them to set the strongest health standards possible to clean up soot pollution. Because of you and thousands of others who also sent in comments, we delivered a strong message to EPA to set the strictest limits on dangerous soot pollution. Continue reading “Join the Fight for Clean Air”

In Drought, Should Corn Be Food Or Fuel?

 Drought has taken a toll on corn this year, and as a result, a growing number of ethanol plants have closed.

Enlarge Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images

Drought has taken a toll on corn this year, and as a result, a growing number of ethanol plants have closed.

August 30, 2012 from MPR

Standing outside the Central Minnesota Ethanol Co-Op in Little Falls, Minn., there’s not a lot going on. The pungent smell of fermentation that typically hangs in the air here is absent. And trucks piled high with corn are nowhere to be seen.

They’re idled in part because of high corn prices. And it’s unclear when that will change.

“Most of the industry is just breaking even in terms of profitability or actually running at slightly negative margins,” says Geoff Cooper, vice president of research and analysis at the Renewable Fuels Association.

Cooper says since the start of the summer at least seven ethanol plants are now idle in states like Nebraska, Minnesota, Indiana and Kansas. Including shutdowns from past years, Cooper says about 10 percent of the nation’s ethanol plants are now offline. Others, though still operating, are running at 75 percent or 80 percent of capacity. Continue reading “In Drought, Should Corn Be Food Or Fuel?”

The Candidates on Climate and Energy: A Guide to the Key Policy Positions of President Obama and Governor Romney

 

This voter guide outlines the records and positions of President Barack Obama and former Gov. Mitt Romney on key climate and energy issues. A side-by-side summary at the top links to more details below.

The nonpartisan guide is based on an examination of the candidates’ actions in office, public statements, campaign materials, news reports, and other publications. It is offered to inform the electorate and contribute to public debate about the nation’s pressing climate and energy issues. As a nonpartisan organization, the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) does not endorse candidates.

C2ES is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan organization promoting strong policy and action to address the twin challenges of energy and climate change. Launched in November 2011, C2ES is the successor to the Pew Center on Global Climate Change. Continue reading “The Candidates on Climate and Energy: A Guide to the Key Policy Positions of President Obama and Governor Romney”

One Million Americans Lead Grassroots Effort for Clean Energy Agenda

 

Photo by Stefan Falke.

Environmental Working Group

Fed up with the undue influence of the energy companies, utilities, lobbyists and other interests that are making it impossible for Washington to move forward decisively in achieving America’s clean energy future, 36 citizen organizations with more than 1.1 million combined members are joining forces to advance a nine-point “American Clean Energy Agenda” and to push for a serious renewable energy agenda no matter who is the next president or which party controls Congress.

The American Clean Energy Agenda is available online by clicking here.

As crafted by the groups, the new American Clean Energy Agenda calls for a number of bold steps, including: phasing out nuclear power, natural gas, coal and industrial biomass in favor of efficient use of renewable, non-polluting resources; opposition to a “clean energy standard” that includes coal, nuclear, oil, gas and unsustainable biomass; retooling federal “loan guarantees” to make smarter investments in renewable energy; greater emphasis on renewable energy and energy efficiency programs; and avoiding a future in which Americans suffer the consequences of mountaintop mining for coal and fracking of shale gas that is then exported for use in other nations. Continue reading “One Million Americans Lead Grassroots Effort for Clean Energy Agenda”

Eileen Claussen Comments on on the Federal Government’s New Fuel Economy Standards

Statement of Eileen Claussen
President, Center for Climate and Energy Solutions

Aug. 28, 2012

This is a win all around – it saves consumers money, reduces dependence on foreign oil, and is the biggest step ever by the United States aimed at reducing carbon emissions.

While Congress remains utterly gridlocked on energy and climate issues, the Obama administration and the auto industry have proven that real progress is still possible.  Working together, they’ve crafted a common-sense solution that taps technological innovation to benefit both the economy and the environment. Credit also goes to the state of California, for paving the way, and to the regulatory flexibility afforded by the Clean Air Act. Continue reading “Eileen Claussen Comments on on the Federal Government’s New Fuel Economy Standards”

Chevy to the Levee: New Clean Car Standards Mean Less Pollution to Fuel Extreme Weather

David Doniger’s Blog

Chevy to the Levee: New Clean Car Standards Mean Less Pollution to Fuel Extreme Weather

Posted August 28, 2012 in Curbing Pollution, Moving Beyond Oil, Solving Global Warming, U.S. Law and Policy

The Obama administration’s new clean car standards mean you’ll save money at the fuel pump while your car pumps out less carbon pollution to fuel dangerous climate change and extreme weather.

Our cars, SUVs, and light trucks account for 20 percent of America’s heat-trapping carbon pollution – second only to our power plants.  Unrestricted carbon pollution is driving up temperatures and fueling increasingly extreme weather – heat waves and drought, storms and floods – with staggering costs to life, limb, and property. Continue reading “Chevy to the Levee: New Clean Car Standards Mean Less Pollution to Fuel Extreme Weather”

Envisioning how Obama or Romney would address energy and climate issues

Submitted by Manik Roy | 08/28/2012

I recently responded to a question on the National Journal blog, “What do the energy and environment policies of President Obama and presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney bode for the country?”

You can read more on the original blog post and other responses here.

Here is my response:

What do the energy and environmental policies of President Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney bode for the country? C2ES recently published a nonpartisan voter guide on the candidates records and statements. Based on our findings, we would expect the following. Continue reading “Envisioning how Obama or Romney would address energy and climate issues”

GM Spring Hill Upgrades Lights With Light Corp, Saves $800,000 A Year

Energy reduced equivalent to saving 657,088 gallons of gas each year.

SPRING HILL, Tenn., Aug. 27, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — General Motors’ Spring Hill Complex expects to save over $800,000 a year on electricity at its general assembly and engine plants by upgrading to Light Corporation’s high-efficiency Semaphore fluorescent light fixtures controlled by Kanepi Innovations’ wireless lighting controls. The combined Spring Hill project presents an initial return on investment of just over 1-year, an investment expected to provide over $12 million in cost savings over a 15-year period. Continue reading “GM Spring Hill Upgrades Lights With Light Corp, Saves $800,000 A Year”

A Look at Rural Clean Energy Solutions for Climate Change Impacts

Grace Gill’s Blog

A Look at Rural Clean Energy Solutions for Climate Change Impacts

Posted August 23, 2012 in Living Sustainably, Solving Global Warming

The word Punjab is derived from Persian, meaning five (panj) rivers (ab).  It is named so for the five rivers coursing through the arable land, like veins through a body, providing the essential nourishment to cultivate the land.  As a child, I grew up amidst tall fields of lush, swaying crops of wheat that stretched for miles and perfumed the air. Our livelihood was dependent on the harvest and environmental balance.        Punjab

Today, that way of life is under threat, from an increasingly warmer atmosphere and its impacts on the ground.  The electricity outage in India, the largest in world history, coupled with the severe drought, has shed light on the region’s vulnerability and lack of preparedness but has also opened many doors for discourse and implementation of clean energy policies and solutions that can help mitigate the effects of climate change. Continue reading “A Look at Rural Clean Energy Solutions for Climate Change Impacts”

Senate Tax Bill Supports Clean Energy, Needs Improvement

Cai Steger’s Blog

Senate Tax Bill Supports Clean Energy, Needs Improvement

Posted August 20, 2012 in Moving Beyond Oil

Before adjourning for August recess, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources committee reported a tax extenders bill addressing the fate of over $200 billion in tax extensions.  Among the 55 tax provisions were 13 energy-related tax extensions, that combined will help shape the growth of our clean energy economy.  While the bill still has a long, uncertain journey  before becoming law, it’s worth examining several of the more important energy provisions related to renewable energy, energy efficiency, and transportation fuels.  Before final passage, Congress should take pains to chart a consitent course away from the dirty fuels of the past toward the clean technologies of the 21st century. Continue reading “Senate Tax Bill Supports Clean Energy, Needs Improvement”